Recycluzz

Creating a new world from rubbish

Ooho! A water bottle you can actually eat

Ooho! banner

It’s no secret that plastic water bottles are a detriment to the environment. What if we could replace those plastic bottles with something more environmentally friendly – edible, even?

Ooho!, a completely biodegradable water “bottle” that eschews plastic packaging altogether for a biodegradable seaweed- and calcium chloride-based membrane that is safe for human consumption. Vaguely reminiscent of a silicone implant, Ooho! is essentially an edible water balloon. When you’re ready to hydrate, you simply pierce the membrane and slurp away:

These 5 Countries Are the Biggest Plastic Polluters

In a recent report, Ocean Conservancy claims that China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam are spewing out as much as 60 percent of the plastic waste that enters the world’s seas.

China – the worst offender – was found to be responsible for 27.7% of “mismanaged plastic” – with up to 245,000 tonnes now floating in our seas.

The US was 20th on the list, accounting for 0.9% of the ocean-bound trash. The UK was not featured, but if 23 EU countries had been included they would collectively have ranked 18th, said the researchers.

In the five Asian countries listed above, only about 40 percent of garbage is properly collected. Across Asia, trash is often piled up in communal dumps where stray bits are swept up by the wind and cast into the ocean.

If the top plastic polluters don’t adopt proper waste management systems, and their demand for plastic-based consumer goods continues to grow (which is guaranteed to happen), then by 2025 there could be one ton of plastic for every three tons of fish in the oceans, according to the report.

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Reuters/Beawiharta BeawihartaA scavenger collects plastic cups for recycling in a river covered with rubbish near Pluit dam in Jakarta.

Countries that dump the more plastic into the oceans

Reuters/Romeo RanocoWorkers load collected plastic bottles onto a truck at a junk shop in Manila.

Countries that dump the more plastic into the oceans

Beawiharta/ReutersIndonesian fishermen on a polluted beach in Cilincing, North Jakarta.

Plastic washes up at Kedonganan Beach in Indonesia. Billions of pounds of plastic pollute the world’s oceans and harm wildlife. Photo: Putu Sayoga/Redux

 

Click here to read the full report from the Ocean Conservancy and the McKinsey Center for Business and Environment.

 

365 stunning upcycled bags

Don’t miss the last weekend to visit the French exhibition “TOUS DANS LE MÊME SAC !

This exhibition features 365 unique bags handmade from recycled clothing, accessories and various materials, but also, fully restored second-hand bags. Those articles were all chosen from among the latests creations of ARTSENS‘ network, a non-profit association based in Nice (South of France). Through an artistic approach, ARTSENS aims at raising the awareness of the necessity to reduce waste. In 2013, their project was nominated for the “Environment Trophy of Nice”. The profit from these sales will be totally donated in order to support a citizen’s initiative respectful of the environment. 

Opening times : Saturday 14th and Sunday 15th November 2015 from 10am to 5pm

 

Dernier weekend pour visiter l’exposition TOUS DANS LE MÊME SAC !

L’association ARTSENS basée à Nice expose jusqu’au 15 Novembre 365 sacs uniques de créateurs fabriqués à partir de matières détournées et des sacs d’occasion restaurés. Cette exposition sensibilise au tri et à la valorisation des déchets à travers une démarche artistique. Ce projet a obtenu le 4ème Trophée de l’environnement à Nice en 2013. Le profit de la vente des sacs sera reversé au réseau Mission de l’UNESCO PACA pour soutenir une action citoyenne liée au Développement Durable.

Horaires d’ouverture : Samedi 14 et Dimanche 15 Novembre 2015 de 10 à 17H

Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Vinyl handbag created by French artist Corinne Reinsch - Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Vinyl handbag created by French artist Corinne Reinsch – Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Artist : Yves Guillemot - Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Artist : Yves Guillemot – Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Giant bag created by Mireille Gaspard and Marie-France Bergerot - Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Giant bag created by Mireille Gaspard and Marie-France Bergerot – Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Artist : Benoit Rousseau - Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Artist : Benoit Rousseau – Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Artist : Nathalie Broyelle - Copyright photo : Thierry Production

Artist : Nathalie Broyelle – Copyright photo : Thierry Production

ARTSENS est toujours en quête de nouveaux matériaux alors n’hésitez pas à leur envoyer un message sur leur site web (http://artsens.wix.com/nice) si vous souhaitez leur faire don de vieux objets tels que machine à coudre, sacs, pochettes, cravates, peluches, vinyles, bijoux, etc.

Adresse:
Chapelle des Pénitents Noirs, 30 Place Carnot, 06440 L’Escarène, FRANCE

Kintsugi, to repair with gold

Kintsugi (Japanese: golden joinery) or Kintsukuroi (Japanese: golden repair) is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum. As a philosophy it treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object, rather than something to disguise.

Higher Perspectives

kintsugi

“(…) the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.”

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Image courtesy: moraapproved, Higher Perspective

PET Art & Design: the new creative obsession for plastic bottles

PET, huh? What?

(CO-(C6H4)-CO-O-(CH2)2-O)n

PETE 1

The widely-known abbreviation PET conceals a substance called polyethylene terephthalate. It is the most common thermoplastic polymer resin of the polyester family. The majority of the world’s PET production is for synthetic fibers (in excess of 60%), with bottle production accounting for about 30% of global demand. In the context of textile applications, PET is referred to by its common name, polyester, whereas the acronym PET is generally used in relation to packaging.

Creative recycling in the Czech Republic: Veronika Richterová

Since 2014, Veronika Richterová creates sculptures from PET thanks to her obsession for plastic bottles. She has used thousands of bottles and developed many specific methods of technological processing.

Veronika Richterova - Plant made from plastic bottles

Veronika Richterova - spiders made from plastic bottles

Veronika Richterova - Flowers made from plastic bottles

Veronika Richterova - Animal made from plastic bottles

Veronika Richterova - Lights made from plastic bottles

Veronika Richterova - Animal made from plastic bottles

The PET-ART museum

Thanks to her idea for PET-ART (Plastic Bottle Art) the necessity of searching for bottles in recycle bins to choose materials for her work was born. Shortly after, she found out that the assortment of plastic bottles had changed very quickly; some of her favorite models had suddenly disappeared and others had surfaced. It became clear that it was necessary to preserve these seemingly worthless and ephemeral objects for the future as a testament of the time.That’s why in 2007 she started, with her husband, to create a collection of this vision. This collection full of unexpected variety has grown to more than 3000 pieces from 76 countries.

Veronika Richterova PET-ART museum

Stunning bottle cap Art

Jorge Castro Gómez, Belgian artist, has found a stunning and colourful way to re-use plastic bottle caps by making big sculptures or portraits. He recently built his “bubble” project thanks to volunteers that helped him out to collect thousand of red bottle caps from a landfill for special waste.

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For more information, please visit: www.jorgecastrogomez.com

 

 

 

 

The Droïdes alias Detritus maritimus

Xavier Plantevin, French artist, was born in Tahiti and grew up in Africa. When he came back to France, he got shocked by the quantity of rubbish washed up on the shore in winter when nobody deign to clean the beach if there is not swimmer. Going ahead, he decided to collect by himself the solid waste in order to give them a second life. The Droïdes alias Detritus maritimus were born! His project became so successful that he created the “Wild star production” studio that allows kids to make themselves their own figurines from rubbish.

 

Kid making a Droïde

Kid making a Droïde

For more information, please visit: http://lafabulerie.com/communaute/plantevin-xavier/

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